You need to show some examples of your work.  Give them your award-winning pieces or samples that you feel are the most compelling and engaging. Some good examples would be your most successful email marketing pieces (if you have access to them), or your most viewed articles on the internet. Bring a hard copy of the articles. This gives the interviewer concrete proof of your writing skills.
The reason is that each form of writing has its own style. News is delivered AP style, in short, informational paragraphs with the meat of the story at the top. Blogging is personable, friendly and often opinionated. Ad copy is short and persuasive. White papers are long; they describe a problem and provide the solution. But, regardless, each and every category is content, and each style writers master makes them more valuable and in demand.
A wise marketer once said: copy is design. And we couldn’t agree more: the shape, flow, and feel of your argument forms the best architecture of a page—and visual design pours in to animate it. Of course, we’re happy to generate ideas with our visually-oriented counterparts. But please resist lorem ipsum text. That leaves copy as an afterthought—and invariably sells your story short.

This might seem obvious, but I see a lot of content that falls flat because the tone and style don’t fit the purpose of the piece or the culture of the brand. For example, a landing page should probably contain copy that is short and designed to persuade the reader to take action. In contrast, a white paper will likely work best with more details to explain a more complex issue.


Some SEO writing positions with corporations and other organizations are full-time, while others are freelance jobs with flexible hours. An organization like the National Association of Independent Writers and Editors (NAIWE) helps SEO writers find employment. SEO writing jobs can be long- or short-term, and compensation rates depend on the type of project.


The content writer doesn’t just write 500 words on how great your hat shop is and call it a day; a good content writer will ensure that in addition to content being fresh, it’s also optimized for the specific keywords that are going to increase your search ranking, bringing more visitors to your site.  We understand the value of a great headline, appropriate keyword density, and keep up with current SEO best practices to ensure that the methods we’re using are the most effective.  If you’ve been seeing your search ranking sinking, a good content writer can dig you out of the hole of SEO silence.
My name is Laci and I am super passionate about anything that allows me to be creative! I first fell in love with graphic design when I was 15 years old. In Junior high I was a part of the student run yearbook staff and learned Adobe Pagemaker. In using that program, I learned about other design programs made by Adobe. A few years later I enrolled in elective courses for graphic and web design. In these courses, I learned the basics of Adobe Photoshop, Adobe Illustrator and basic HTML. Beyond these courses, I have no formal education and have built upon my skills through experience, online tutorials and a desperate...
In some cases, the guidance or existing copy that a content writer receives from his or her client is, in a word, awful. Many are the days that I’ve sat down to look at a wall of ill-formatted, poorly spelled, stream-of-consciousness rough copy, and begin the arduous task of editing and polishing it. It’s the intellectual equivalent of cleaning up someone else’s bedroom: you just don’t want to know what goes on in there to cause such a mess. Still, we do it, and we smile, because in the end making you look and sound good is what our jobs are all about.
The U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) reported that writers in general earned a mean yearly salary of $73,090 as of May 2018. However, there was a wide variance in wages among writers. The bottom ten percent of professionals took in $31,700 or less each year, while the top ten percent of these workers made $121,670 or more annually. The BLS reported that technical writers in particular earned a mean wage of $75,500 as of 2018, with most of these professionals making between $43,110 and $114,930 each year.
The content writer doesn’t just write 500 words on how great your hat shop is and call it a day; a good content writer will ensure that in addition to content being fresh, it’s also optimized for the specific keywords that are going to increase your search ranking, bringing more visitors to your site.  We understand the value of a great headline, appropriate keyword density, and keep up with current SEO best practices to ensure that the methods we’re using are the most effective.  If you’ve been seeing your search ranking sinking, a good content writer can dig you out of the hole of SEO silence.

A technical writer is frequently confused with a tech writer, but their skills are distinctly different. A technical writer is an ace at making highly technical content easier for others to understand. They provide in-depth explanations of technology — how to use it, how to build it, the processes, the components, the inner workings, and the mechanics.
In addition to the playful header, "not the usual blah blah," the copy above takes on a farm theme, assuring visitors that employees aren't simply "caged hens." Rather, they're a "free-range, artisanal, cruelty-free team." Funny on the surface, but helpful to job seekers who, much like food, want to know where their work comes from and how it's made.
Employers of SEO content writers may not specify a degree requirement, though bachelor's degrees in journalism, English, communications or similar fields are common. Related experience may be required, and SEO content writers should have strong writing, editing and proofreading skills. Aditionally, they should be proficient with Web programming languages, such as HTML or XML, and basic knowledge of SEO is preferred or required for some positions. According to 2016 earnings data gathered by Payscale.com, content writers earned a median salary of $40,951.
My name is Laci and I am super passionate about anything that allows me to be creative! I first fell in love with graphic design when I was 15 years old. In Junior high I was a part of the student run yearbook staff and learned Adobe Pagemaker. In using that program, I learned about other design programs made by Adobe. A few years later I enrolled in elective courses for graphic and web design. In these courses, I learned the basics of Adobe Photoshop, Adobe Illustrator and basic HTML. Beyond these courses, I have no formal education and have built upon my skills through experience, online tutorials and a desperate...
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